Going (Really, Really) Green: Earth’s Plant Life, as Seen From Space
Megan Garber, theatlantic.com
Satellite images of vegetation can help to forecast droughts and fires and even diseases.The Earth is the “Blue Plan­et” because more than 70 per­cent of its sur­face is cov­ered in water. But what does the Blue Plan­et look like with­out the…

Going (Really, Really) Green: Earth’s Plant Life, as Seen From Space
Megan Garber, theatlantic.com

Satellite images of vegetation can help to forecast droughts and fires and even diseases.

The Earth is the “Blue Plan­et” because more than 70 per­cent of its sur­face is cov­ered in water. But what does the Blue Plan­et look like with­out the…

mothernaturenetwork:


 How a plan to destroy Gezi Park in Turkey sparked nationwide protests  



Tiny Gezi Park in Istanbul doesn’t look like much, but it started a firestorm.

mothernaturenetwork:

Tiny Gezi Park in Istanbul doesn’t look like much, but it started a firestorm.

mothernaturenetwork:

How one family is living off the grid
Sonny and Linda Jobe live in Doddridge County, W.Va., in a house too far out to be connected to city utilities. They make it work with solar energy and generators.

mothernaturenetwork:

How one family is living off the grid

Sonny and Linda Jobe live in Doddridge County, W.Va., in a house too far out to be connected to city utilities. They make it work with solar energy and generators.

emergentfutures:

MoboSens, a Square-like tool for eco warriors, lets you crowdsource water pollutants


The project, called MoboSens, relies on a large sensor plugged into the audio jack on a smartphone. It looks like an ugly (and huge) Square dongle, but instead of taking payments it senses water quality using a microeletromechanical (MEMs) sensor inside the dongle. The goal is to eventually use the MEMs packed into the device to measure nitrate, heavy metal, carcinogens, and bacteria in water.
 
Full Story: GigaOm

emergentfutures:

MoboSens, a Square-like tool for eco warriors, lets you crowdsource water pollutants

The project, called MoboSens, relies on a large sensor plugged into the audio jack on a smartphone. It looks like an ugly (and huge) Square dongle, but instead of taking payments it senses water quality using a microeletromechanical (MEMs) sensor inside the dongle. The goal is to eventually use the MEMs packed into the device to measure nitrate, heavy metal, carcinogens, and bacteria in water.

 

Full Story: GigaOm

China Photo of the Day: The Egg Lady
Matt Schiavenza, theatlantic.com
Mod­ern super­mar­kets dot the land­scape through­out China, but peo­ple can still buy their food the old-fashioned way: on the street. The pho­tog­ra­ph­er Michael Stev­er­son has spent years pho­tograph­ing rural China, where hun­dreds of mil­li…

China Photo of the Day: The Egg Lady
Matt Schiavenza, theatlantic.com

Mod­ern super­mar­kets dot the land­scape through­out China, but peo­ple can still buy their food the old-fashioned way: on the street. The pho­tog­ra­ph­er Michael Stev­er­son has spent years pho­tograph­ing rural China, where hun­dreds of mil­li…

This is about more than just advertorial — it’s about brands going direct
By Mathew Ingram, paidcontent.org
There’s been plenty of focus on how publishers are catering to advertisers by producing “native” advertising, including sponsored content — but a much bigger trend is brands and advertisers that are becoming publishers themselves.We’ve been…

A good description of the business model we are trying to follow.

This is about more than just advertorial — it’s about brands going direct
By Mathew Ingram, paidcontent.org

There’s been plenty of focus on how publishers are catering to advertisers by producing “native” advertising, including sponsored content — but a much bigger trend is brands and advertisers that are becoming publishers themselves.

We’ve been…

A good description of the business model we are trying to follow.

greenpeace:

Climate science 101
Do you know these iconic climate graphs?
These three graphs (among many, many more) show just some of the clear observational evidence that we’re changing the climate: global temperatures are rising and arctic sea ice is 
disappearing while CO2 emissions keep rising. Find out more about these graphs and what they mean here

greenpeace:

According to a new report from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) globally, nearly $2 trillion are spent each year in subsidies to oil, natural gas and coal companies. Are you paying to melt the Arctic? Find out more here.

greenpeace:

According to a new report from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) globally, nearly $2 trillion are spent each year in subsidies to oil, natural gas and coal companies. Are you paying to melt the Arctic? Find out more here.

theadventureproject:

We want you to meet 30 of of the amazing water-well mechanics you helped to sponsor last year on World Water Day. Here’s Well Mechanic #16!

If you’d like to help us bring water-well mechanics to Africa, check out our campaign page and get involved, here: http://www.stayclassy.org/events/help-bring-water-well-mechanics-to-africa-waterworks/e23733

Meet: Surnimal!Where he works: Madhusudanpur Number of wells he maintains: 60Family status: Married with one boy and one girlJob before becoming a Well Mechanic: He had worked with NGOs before and felt passionately about their work.Why he decided to become a Well Mechanic: Being a Jalabandhu means you’re providing a crucial service to the community. Our local government has been very supportive of the Jalabandhu program, and is proud that I can reduce breakdown periods and make water available to people throughout the day.

theadventureproject:

We want you to meet 30 of of the amazing water-well mechanics you helped to sponsor last year on World Water Day. Here’s Well Mechanic #16!

If you’d like to help us bring water-well mechanics to Africa, check out our campaign page and get involved, here: http://www.stayclassy.org/events/help-bring-water-well-mechanics-to-africa-waterworks/e23733

Meet: Surnimal!
Where he works: Madhusudanpur
Number of wells he maintains: 60
Family status: Married with one boy and one girl
Job before becoming a Well Mechanic: He had worked with NGOs before and felt passionately about their work.
Why he decided to become a Well Mechanic: Being a Jalabandhu means you’re providing a crucial service to the community. Our local government has been very supportive of the Jalabandhu program, and is proud that I can reduce breakdown periods and make water available to people throughout the day.